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Biological Evaluation

Menegotto, et al. (1998) evaluated the histological aspects of the Ultratooth® implant. They used the standard staining techniques to indicate the location and rate of bone formation around implants. These are: 1) Goldern’s stain, 2) H&E stain, 3) Calcein Green and 4) Microradiographs (Fig. 4 1 6). Their investigation showed that new bone forms on the surface of the Ultratooth® implant, and that a fibrous layer is not present. Moreover, the surface area that is actually osseointegrated may be much greater than the 30% that is usually seen with conventional implants due to the internal surfaces of the 5 ‘legs’ becoming osseointegrated (the expansion screw itself becomes the 5th ‘leg’).

Recreation of Soft Tissue

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Fig. 4-1 Goldern’s slam is employed to detect osteoid and mineralized bone. Red portion indicates osteoid, and favorable osseointegration is suggested. (Courtesy of et al. Lewis Menegotto, University of Indiana, School of Dentistry.)

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Fig. 4- 2 Optical microscopic photo. It is confirmed that the implant is surrounded by bone, and no soft tissue exists at the bone/implant interface. (Courtesy of et al. Lewis Menegotto, University of Indiana, School of Dentistry.)

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Fig. 4-3 Multiple fluorochrome labeling. Bone activity is observed twice a week. The circles of bone layers are one week apart. High osteoblastic activity is suggested.
(Courtesy of et al. Lewis Menegotto, University of Indiana, School of Dentistry.)

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Fig. 4-4 New bone is observed around the apical end of the implant. This means that microleakage is not occurring. (Courtesy of et al. Lewis Menegotto, University of Indiana, School of Dentistry.)

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Fig. 4-5 Bone/implant interface. The implant is observed to be surrounded by bone. (Courtesy of et al. Lewis Menegotto, University of Indiana, School of Dentistry.)

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Fig. 4-6 Specimen of the implant placed in a dog which reaches the inferior alveolar nerve. Due to the lack of sensation cause by anesthesia, the dog had been biting strongly upon the implant. The implant, however, demonstrates osseointegration. (Courtesy of et al. Lewis Menegotto, University of Indiana, School of Dentistry.)